The English ale yeast experiment continues – Wyeast 1318

For the past few months I have been brewing pale ales with a range of different yeasts and as a follower of The Mad Fermentationist blog I thought it was about time I tried Wyeast 1318. The author of the blog Michael Tonsmeire has been brewing several beers with Wyeast 1318 one of which is called Hop Juice – Northeast IPA which from his description sounded like the perfect IPA.

Not wanting to simply copy the recipe on the blog I took an old pale ale recipe I have brewed many times and swapped the yeast to 1318 and changed the dryhopping schedule so that I dryhopped it while the fermentation was still very active.

The Pale ale had an OG of 1.046 and was dry hopped with a generous amount of Citra and Amarillo. This was a 50L batch and used a mash efficiency of 85%. The grist and hopping schedule is below.

Grist and hop schedule

Ingredients
Amt Name Type # %/IBU
11.23 kg Pale Malt (2 Row) low colour UK (4.0 EBC) Grain 1 100.0 %
10.00 g Citra [12.00 %] – Boil 90.0 min Hop 2 7.1 IBUs
150.00 g Citra [12.00 %] – Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min Hop 3 31.4 IBUs
50.00 g Amarillo Gold [8.50 %] – Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min Hop 4 7.4 IBUs
1.0 pkg – 4L starter London Ale III (Wyeast Labs #1318) Yeast 5
150.00 g Citra [12.00 %] – Dry Hop 4.0 Days Hop 6 0.0 IBUs
50.00 g Amarillo Gold [8.50 %] – Dry Hop 4.0 Days Hop 7 0.0 IBUs

Gravity, Alcohol Content and Color

Bitterness: 45.9 IBUs
Est Color: 6.5 EBC
Measured Original Gravity: 1.046 SG
Measured Final Gravity: 1.011 SG
Actual Alcohol by Vol: 4.7 %

The mash was at 64degC for 60min and the boil was for 90min. The wort was then pumped to the Whirlpool for a 30min rest before being knocked out to the fermenter. The wort was oxygenated at 1L per min for 2min. Yeast was pitched at 17degC and allowed to rise to 19degC, on day 4 the dryhops were added and the temp increased to 20degC for a further 4days. At this point the fermenter was crashed to 2degC and the yeast/hops dropped out of the bottom dump valve on the conical. The final gravity being 1.011.

Following 7days at 2degC the beer was transferred to 2 x corny kegs and force carbonated. One interesting thing is that normally after 7 days at 2degC I would expect the beer to be fairly clear but not this time it still had a very distinctive haze! Comment from The Mad Fermentationists blog seem to be correct, dryhopping during the active fermentation phase with this yeast really do have a drastic effect on beer clarity. The picture below shows the hazy beer, this photo was taken about a week after the beer had been kegged and placed in the kegerator at 5degC.

IMG_1597This really is one of the most refreshing pale ales I have brewed, it comes in at about 4.7% but drinks so easily its unbelievable, it is a true session pale ale, the aroma has a big citrus hit with everything you would expect from a big whirlpool and dry hop addition of Citra, but the Amarillo just restrains it nicely, it kind of takes the sharp corners off the Citra which can sometimes be unpleasant in Citra only beers.

And the bit I was not ready for was the depth of flavour when you take a mouthful; it really is like tropical/citrus fruit juice on the tongue! The one thing I think it does need is a little more mouth feel, I think an addition of something like 5% Carapils and may be 2-3% of Caramalt would take care of this, as too would mashing a little warmer say 66degC – but I think I would sooner mash at 64degC to keep the ferment ability and just add a small percentage of speciality malts to and the malt complexity to the beer.

I’m that impressed with this beer that the yeast will soon be getting another outing, this time an all Simcoe IPA which will come in at about 6%.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s